Roofing Accidents Lawyer

Construction sites by their very nature are inherently dangerous places. Approximately twenty-five percent (25%) of all construction site fatalities involve falls. While Construction site falls account for most of the serious injuries or deaths in the construction industry, falls by roofing workers are three times (3x’s) more likely to result in such a serious injury or death compared to other types of construction accidents. According to the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, almost 60 construction workers were killed in roofing accidents in 2019 and over eight hundred workers died from falls on construction sites. Roofing accidents may occur from falls, falling objects, tools, heat exposure or even electrocution.

Working on a high building or elevated roof in adverse conditions and uneven levels, is dangerous work. OSHA – The Occupational Safety and Health Administration mandates certain precautions that must be taken to prevent roofing accidents. Unfortunately, many owners and contractors do not adhere to these safety guidelines which are outlined by industry safety experts and break the law.

The construction accident lawyers at Pazer, Epstein, Jaffe & Fein, P.C. have years of experience representing construction workers and roofers hurt in accidents. We help clients throughout the New York City are in Manhattan, Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens, and Long Island. We may be reached for a free consultation in New York City at (212) 847-5007 or on Long Island at (718) 954-9986.

New York Law Protects Roofers on Construction Sites

New York’s Labor Law Sections 200, 240 and 241(4) are established to protect workers such as roofers hurt on the job. These laws establish strict safety guidelines for property owners and contractors to ensure construction workers are kept safe on construction sites. The New York Labor law can be complex however, as such you should consult with a law firm familiar with these construction laws to protect your rights and to obtain the most compensation possible for your injuries. A roofer hurt on a construction site should not have to settle exclusively for Worker’s Compensation. If there exists an appropriate Owner and General Contractor, many other claims for injury exist.

NYC LABOR LAW SECTION 240(1)

Most relevant to roofing accidents, is New York Labor Law Section 240, commonly known as the New York “Scaffold Law.” Section 240(1) protects workers from falls and from objects falling upon them on a construction site. A claim under this code section of New York Law allows for damages beyond the limitations of Worker’s Compensation and allow for a far greater recovery for roofers hurt in accidents on construction sites.

New York Labor Law § 240(1) provides:

Scaffolding and other devices for use of employees:

All contractors and owners and their agents, except owners of one and two-family dwellings who contract for but do not direct or control the work, in the erection, demolition, repairing, altering, painting, cleaning, or pointing of a building or structure shall furnish or erect, or cause to be furnished or erected for the performance of such labor, scaffolding, hoists, stays, ladders, slings, hangers, blocks, pulleys, braces, irons, ropes, and other devices which shall be so constructed, placed and operated as to give proper protection to a person so employed…

Common Roofer Accidents

Many of the types of roofing accidents that occur include the following:

Typical Roofing Injuries

Injuries from these types of accidents include injuries to ones:

Experienced Lawyers for Roofing Accidents and Injuries in New York City

If you or a loved one of a roofer is hurt in a roofing accident, contact our personal injury construction accident lawyers for a free consultation. The lawyers of Pazer, Epstein, Jaffe & Fein, P.C. have decades of experience in construction accident law. We will fight to get you the most compensation available for your injuries and help to recover the cost of medical bills, lost past and future wages, rehabilitation costs, pain and suffering and other related damages.